Tuesday, September 13, 2011

The Only Way Many of These Films Will Be Seen: "Boys Life 3"



It seems that whenever mainstream Hollywood makes a gay themed film, the world is going to end thanks to the subject matter.

Short films also deal with gay themes, and companies like Strand Releasing and Picture This! collect them together in compilation DVDs. Some of the films are good, some aren't, and some of the DVDs are good, some aren't. "Boys Life 3" is one such compilation, and it is one of the good ones. The films are reviewed individually:

Inside Out (Directed by Jason Gould) (4/5*)
Gould films in familiar territory- being the gay son of two celebrities. Gould plays Aaron, a struggling actor better known for his better known parents. He gets set up by his friend Adam (Alexis Arquette) on a blind date with a closeted man, goes to the Church of Scientology, and is hounded by a tabloid photographer (Jon Polito). Gould makes some funny observations about being the son of celebrities, even bringing in real life dad Elliott Gould. Christina Crawford shows up at a Survivors of Celebrity Parents support meeting, as does Summer Ladd, daughter of Cheryl Ladd. I wish more of Gould's ideas had a chance to draw out and become whole. He tries to hard to get a shot in at everybody, which does not work on a film that runs under half an hour. On the other hand, his light directorial touch is perfectly suited for his screenplay.

Just One Time (Directed by Lane Janger) (4/5*)
Anthony (Lane Janger) wants girlfriend Amy (Joelle Carter) to have sex with another woman as part of his fantasy "just one time." She then turns the tables on him. This is a vibrantly colored short, to the point, and very funny more because of its actors than Janger's screenplay. Cute stuff, women like Amy can probably relate, and maybe should try this.

Hitch (Directed by Bradley Rust Gray) (3/5*)
Two men, one gay and one possibly gay, drive around in a Volkswagen bus in the desert. This film had a great aged look to it, but the overuse of closeups was jarring, and the film began to bore me. The two leads were good, but the script felt too light.

Majorettes in Space (Directed by David Fourier) (4/5*)
From France, this mockumentary ties in one heterosexual couple, one gay man, the production of condoms, the Pope, and the obvious fact that when a Cosmonaut calls his wife a "fat cow," he is using a metaphor. This is a very fast and freaky collection of images, and it not only works, but makes some kind of sense. Fourier is making a statement about AIDS and protecting oneself sexually, but he does not take his point and belabor it.

$30 (Directed by Gregory Cooke) (4/5*)
Teenage Scott (Erik MacArthur) is presented with thirty dollar teen hooker Emily (Sara Gilbert) on his birthday, and she figures out why he is not interested in sex with her. The final film is also a good effort, with MacArthur and Gilbert scoring major indie film points, and having a really nice chemistry. Emily's character is not delved into much, because this is not her story. Cooke's direction is fine, if not a bit awkward here and there, and Christopher Landon's script is smart (watch for the inside joke concerning Emily's choice of TV viewing habits). A solid entry.

"Boys Life 3" is recommendable based on all the films, with "Majorettes in Space" being the best film. (* * * *) out of five stars. Get this movie now!: Boys Life 3 [VHS]